6D: The Brutality of Corporate Street Art

Corporate street art: widely considered by street artists as absolutely, positively taboo.  The reality of the situation is that corporations are looking to capitalize on the popularity of street art sweeping the nation. Incorporating street art into their latest advertising campaigns means injecting a sense of cool to their brands, giving them instant credibility with young adults.

However, while these multimillion dollar companies are busy exploiting the movement, they are intentionally killing the essence of street art and its culture. Street art was NEVER meant to be packaged, and sold – it’s an art form that stands on the merit of strong opinions. Exploiting it to sell products is wrong and completely destroys the essence of the movement.

That is the issue I have with corporate street art.

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Artist Feature: Jan Vormann’s Lego Art

  • Have you heard of Jan Vormann? He’s the German artist who travels around the world repairing buildings with broken crevices and filling them with Lego. Vormann’s project titled Dispatchwork has spread worldwide in cities like London, New York, and Tel Aviv. The bright and colorful composition create a delightful juxtaposition from the actual mundane building walls, wouldn’t you agree?

What is it all supposed to mean? Vormann says that there is no real meaning behind his works. His main goal however is to get people to stop in their tracks, draw their attention and hopefully ask themselves why the Lego was there. His works have become so popular that people from all over the world have begun their own ‘dispatchwork’ in their own cities.

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4C: The Dilemma with Reverse Graffiti

We all know what graffiti is. How it’s considered a crime for defacing public property but what about reverse graffiti? I’m sure once in your life you’ve taken your finger and doodled a picture from the dirty windshield of your parent’s car; that’s exactly what reverse graffiti is. Reverse graffiti is art that is created by literally removing dirt from surfaces. Its graffiti by means of subtracting dirt and creating a temporary image that can be scrubbed and washed away with ease.

Believe it or not, because of its unique attributes reverse graffiti has turned out to be one of the more highly debated topics in street art. Is it really considered illegal to remove dirt from surfaces? Of course not, but when the word ‘graffiti’ is attached to the act it’s immediately labeled as an illegal practice. This is the dilemma that has befallen reverse graffiti.

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3C: I Love Flash Mobs ♥

Street art comes in a lot of forms and variations, even to this day the movement is constantly evolving. Listed below are some (but not all) forms of the diverse genre:

  • Graffiti
  • Sticker Art
  • Poster Art
  • Stencil Art
  • Installations
  • Video Projection

But what you might not know is that the list also includes forms that aren’t instantly recognized as street art. The ‘flash mob’ is categorized under street art but not many people know this (shocker!). Read on to learn more about one of the most popular forms of street art that is sure to get your heart racing and your face grinning with excitement!

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Artist Feature: Edgar Mueller (Anamorphic Pavement Art)

You’ve probably seen his works before but one thing’s for sure, Edgar Mueller’s street art never fails to impress every time. Instead of traditional graffiti pieces, Mueller’s art shifts from building walls into pavement roads where he applies a great deal of perspective into his surreal paintings – giving the effect of a realistic 3D scene when viewed at a specific angle.

Hit the jump for more info and images of Mueller’s works.

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